Posts Tagged ‘vocabulary’

New Meanings for Old Words

3 years ago, I’ve come across this article and it was quite funny and creative. Back then, I didn’t have so much followers but I can say that this blog post resulted in many new followers! 🙂

For those who hasn’t read it, which I think there is a lot people out there as such, I highly recommend you to check it out for all these funny definitions of everyday words! 🙂

Conference room np. A place where everyone talks, no one listens, and later everyone disagrees about what was said.

Doctor n. A person who kills your ills with pills then kills you with bills.

Lecture n. The art of transferring information from the notes of the lecturer to the notes of the lecturees without passing through the minds of either.

Tears n. The means by which masculine will-power is defeated by feminine water-power.

Carnation n. Country where each citizen owns an automobile

Emotion n. Electron movement (also e-motion).

Maritime n. Hour of a wedding.

Catacomb, n. What a feline uses to straighten its hair.

Biology, n. The scientific study of the number two.

Thesaurus, n. A dinosaur that studies words.

Hamlet, n. A small pig.

Tumor, n. One more than one more.

Laughing_owl

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Interesting Old English Words

Screen Shot 2014-01-30 at 00.24.41When I watch a movie or TV series, I just can’t help but looking up the words I don’t know- even if I understand the meaning from the context. It is an urge to see the exact equivalence and to take for as they are. 🙂 I guess it is just an old habit from my of high school days

Anyway, sometimes I come across with such interesting words that I just don’t understand how people naturally use them in an everyday conversation! The other day I’ve heard the one “egrote” and I couldn’t find it in an English-Turkish dictionary. I googled it and came across to this interesting article. 

I’ve selected the ones that I like most. You can always click the link at the bottom to read the whole article. 🙂

To egrote: to fake sickness to avoid work. (I have a modern reaction to this verb: seems legit :D)

To fudgel: to pretend to work when you’re not actually doing anything at all. (Word used in the eighteenth century. Too bad it’s no longer used, because it is really useful!)

A pedeconference: to hold a meeting while walking. (I can definitely see myself using this term!)

To uhtceare:  to wake up before dawn and be unable to go back to sleep because you’re worried about something.

Twitter-light: twilight. (This term was used in the early seventeenth century, although it seems quite modern. It actually has nothing to do with social media and is a really romantic word that refers to the hours as the sun setting)

Thanks for the article writer who has compiled such an interesting list. You can visit the blog and see more interesting old English words here. 

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Culture and Vocabulary

Today is a snowy day in Istanbul. 🙂 Whenever it snows, I just couldn’t help but think how culture affects the vocabulary. You know what I’m talking about: Inuit words about snow. 🙂
In my culture, we always a strong bond with our relatives, so we have tens of words to define all kinds of relatives. Anyway, this is another topic alone. 🙂 What I’m trying to say is that culture affects the variety of vocabulary. In the image below, we see how Inuit culture has different words for every state of snow. 🙂

 

words-for-snow

 

Source: http://nunawhaa.files.wordpress.com/2012/03/words-for-snow.jpg

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Maps Explaining the World

All these years, I see that people who are interested in languages are also interested in almost every topic in the world. 🙂 Especially those related to foreign cultures are the top… We are curious about their languages, cultures, religions, rituals, traditions, law systems, education systems, attitudes… You see, almost anything but we have a reason to be like that since translating a languages is equal to translating a culture… Without knowing anything, the translation process is just poor and many times results in mistakes.

2 days ago, my friend shared a post by Washington Post. It was about the maps of the world- yeah I know you are excited. 🙂

Well, the original post contains 40 different maps explaining the world in a different way. Here, I’ve chosen the ones in which I think you will be interested most.

 

Where people are the most and least welcoming to foreigners

openness4

Major religions

world-map-all-religions-1

Where people are the most and least emotional

emotional-map2

Where people feel the most and least loved

love-map

The most and least ethnically diverse countries

diverity-map-harvard2

Legal systems

Qd2wi

 

 

The source: http://wapo.st/14kqhbX

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Untranslatable “Love Words”

bee_my_honey_by_toxicpineapple-d5f6le1 It is interesting that we have tens of “love words” that we use everyday. I call them “love words” in quotation because I couldn’t find a better phrase for them. 🙂

The other day, some of my friends call me as “gülüm”. When we translate this into English, it is “my rose”. It sounds quite funny when translated. 🙂 “Gül” means “rose” in Turkish and we use it as a “love word” among family members or close friends. Similarly there is “kuzum”, the translation is “my sheep”. 🙂 I know how funny it sounds.

Then I just thought the English “love words”. There is “honey” and we directly use it in Turkish but it is a recent usage – probably just pass from English with the new generation and television.

I’m sure there are tens of untranslatable “love words” in your language as well… What about sharing them with us? 🙂


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Think & Smile

111014_IP-141020111200-LargeI don’t know if you’ve ever heard of it but there is an old social network called “Reddit”. I don’t use it frequently but one of my friends is a huge fan of it. The other day, he sent me a link which is full of intellectual jokes, which I think you’ll love!

These jokes are generally about famous philosophers or scientists and they reflect the wit of these people. They may be about theories or concepts used in science or philosophy.The link follows: “What’s the most intellectual joke you know?” Let’s see some of them…

 

 

Jean-Paul Sartre is sitting at a French cafe, revising his draft of Being and Nothingness. He says to the waitress, “I’d like a cup of coffee, please, with no cream.” The waitress replies, “I’m sorry, Monsieur, but we’re out of cream. How about with no milk?”

“Is it solipsistic in here, or is it just me?”

A physicist, a mathematician and an engineer were each asked to establish the volume of a red rubber ball. The physicist immersed the ball in a beaker full of water and measured the volume of the displaced fluid. The mathematician measured the diameter and calculated a triple integral. The engineer looked it up in his Red Rubber Ball Volume Table.

Werner Heisenberg, Kurt Gödel, and Noam Chomsky walk into a bar. Heisenberg turns to the other two and says, “Clearly this is a joke, but how can we figure out if it’s funny or not?” Gödel replies, “We can’t know that because we’re inside the joke.” Chomsky says, “Of course it’s funny. You’re just telling it wrong.”

Day 19, I have successfully conditioned my master to smile and write in his book every time I drool.- Pavlov’s Dog

A physicist, a mathematician and an engineer stay in a hotel.

The engineer is awakened by a smell and gets up to check it. He finds a fire in the hallway, sees a nearby fire extinguisher and after extinguishing it, goes back to bed. Later that night, the physicist gets up, again because of the smell of fire. He quickly gets up and sees the fire in the hallway. After calculating air pressure, flame temperature and humidity as well as distance to the fire and projected trajectory, he extinguishes the fire with the least amount of fluid. At last, the mathematician awakes, only again to find a fire in the hallway. He instantly sees the extinguisher and thinks, “A solution exists!”, and heads back into his room.

 

To be continued! 🙂

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The History of the Oxford English Dictionary

Oxford_English_Dictionary_2ndLooking familiar? I’m sure each and every one of you has this dictionary. 🙂 In deed, the Oxford English Dictionary was my first dictionary. 

Last week we were discussing about how come we all have the same dictionary… And I decided to Google its history…

For those we want to learn key information about the OED can just have a look what I’ve found.

 

 

The Oxford English Dictionary (OED), published by the Oxford University Press, is the premier British dictionary of the English language.

Work began on the dictionary in 1857 but published 1884.

It was a project under the name A New English Dictionary on Historical Principles; Founded Mainly on the Materials Collected by The Philological Society.

In 1895, the title The Oxford English Dictionary (OED) was first used.

In 1928 the full dictionary was republished in ten bound volumes.

In 1933 it was republished in its reprinting as twelve volumes with a one volume supplement.

In 1989, the second edition was published in twenty volumes.

The first electronic version of the dictionary was made available in 1988.

The online version has been available since 2000.

As of August 2010, it has been receiving two million hits per month from paying subscribers.

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With descriptions for approximately 750,000 words, the Oxford English Dictionary is the world’s most comprehensive single-language print dictionary according to the Guinness Book of World Records.

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