Posts Tagged ‘türkçe çeviri’

The History of the Oxford English Dictionary

Oxford_English_Dictionary_2ndLooking familiar? I’m sure each and every one of you has this dictionary. 🙂 In deed, the Oxford English Dictionary was my first dictionary. 

Last week we were discussing about how come we all have the same dictionary… And I decided to Google its history…

For those we want to learn key information about the OED can just have a look what I’ve found.

 

 

The Oxford English Dictionary (OED), published by the Oxford University Press, is the premier British dictionary of the English language.

Work began on the dictionary in 1857 but published 1884.

It was a project under the name A New English Dictionary on Historical Principles; Founded Mainly on the Materials Collected by The Philological Society.

In 1895, the title The Oxford English Dictionary (OED) was first used.

In 1928 the full dictionary was republished in ten bound volumes.

In 1933 it was republished in its reprinting as twelve volumes with a one volume supplement.

In 1989, the second edition was published in twenty volumes.

The first electronic version of the dictionary was made available in 1988.

The online version has been available since 2000.

As of August 2010, it has been receiving two million hits per month from paying subscribers.

Visit our Facebook page to read and enjoy more posts about languages!

You can also follow me on Twitter.

Let’s get connected more! We are on Google+.

What about learning more about AIM Consulting?

With descriptions for approximately 750,000 words, the Oxford English Dictionary is the world’s most comprehensive single-language print dictionary according to the Guinness Book of World Records.

Advertisements

Rules for Freelancers

If you’re freelancer, it is quite hard not to procrastinate at home. 🙂 You just want to start something but without noticing, you happen to be distracted by Facebook or other social networks… – or simply by Wikipedia. Yeah, I like reading Wikis, too. 🙂

So, if you want to keep up with your deadlines, you just have to make some rules for themselves. Whenever I get a translation, I use this tactic: “I will not check other websites until I finish 5 pages.” I’m sure you all have such rules and it will be useful if you share them with us. 🙂

Let’s see another alternatives…

942039_10101795436093503_457524346_n

 

Visit our Facebook page to read and enjoy more posts about languages!

You can also follow me on Twitter.

Let’s get connected more! We are on Google+.

What about learning more about AIM Consulting?

Find Out the Similarities Between Languages

There are thousands of languages and dialects around the world. If you encounter a language that you’ve never heard before, you feel like an alien is speaking to you. 🙂

But it doesn’t work like that for people who are interested in foreign languages. Instead of listening to an alien speech, we try to understand some certain patterns, we give attention to syllable stresses, we try to find some lexical similarities between our own language and this “alien speech”. 🙂

So, I discovered an interesting website showing the similarities between languages. It does not go in detail and it only shows the percetages of the similarities in certain categories, but I’m sure you’ll want to check it up. 🙂

 

First, you select the language that you want to compare to other languages:

Screen Shot 2013-05-05 at 16.32.34

Than you can see the similarities a certain language shares with others.

Screen Shot 2013-05-05 at 16.33.05

Cactuses (Difficulty) indicate the relative difficulty of learning this language if you already speak Italian. The fewer cactuses/cacti, the easier.

Here is the website: http://how-to-learn-any-language.com/e/languages/similarities/index.html

Enjoy! 🙂

 

Visit our Facebook page to read and enjoy more posts about languages!

You can also follow me on Twitter.

Let’s get connected more! We are on Google+.

What about learning more about AIM Consulting?

The Language of the Week: Fula

Maybe, most of the people is just interested in major languages which are English, French, German, Chinese etc. However, a translator is interested in ALL the languages no matter how many people speak it- or no matter if it is already dead or not. 🙂

Here comes another language in which you will be interested. I hope there are native speakers of this language among us and I hope they can give more information about it. 🙂  

The Fula or Fulani language is a language of West Africa. It belongs to the Senegambian branch of the Niger–Congo language family. It is spoken as a first language by the Fula or Fulani people from Senegambia and Guinea to Cameroonand Sudan.

Fulani is an official language in Senegal (Pulaar) and Nigeria (Fulfulde), an official regional language in Guinea (Pular), where many speakers are monolingual, and a national language of Mali (Maasina) and Niger (Fulfulde).

There are several names applied to the language, just as there are to the Fula people. They call their language Pulaar or Pular in the western dialects and Fulfulde in the central and eastern dialects.

It uses suffixes (sometimes inaccurately called infixes, as they come between the root and the inflectional ending) to modify meaning.

There are about 25 noun classes (the number may vary slightly in different dialects). Each noun class has a singular and plural form, and each form has a corresponding article, nominative pronoun, accusative/dative pronoun, demonstrative adjective and adjective agreement pattern.

661

 

This is written in Fula language. It means:

One evening a judge found in a book that everyone who had a little head and a long beard was a fool. Now the judge had a little head and a long beard, so he said to himself, “I cannot increase the size of my head, but I will shorten my beard.” He hunted for the scissors, but could not find them. Without further ado he took half of his beard in his hand and put the other half into the candle and burnt it. When the flame reached his hand he let go, and all the beard was burned. Thus the judge felt ashamed, for he had proved the truth of what was written in the book.

P.S. Most of the information is taken from Wikipedia. I’ve just summarize the certain parts and have not included all the information there.

Visit our Facebook page to read and enjoy more posts about languages!

You can also follow me on Twitter.

Let’s get connected more! We are on Google+.

What about learning more about AIM Consulting?

Duolingo

While the internet has become a vital part of our lives, it just goes beyond the computers or laptops… With tablet and smart phones, we carry the internet wherever we go and we really need it when we are mobile. So, the famous internet websites find enjoyable applications to promote their brand in mobile as well.

Thanks to one of my friends, I come across with a perfect mobile application for language lovers: Duolingo!

Screen Shot 2013-04-06 at 19.09.00

Its web site is quite colorful and funny. It makes you practice a language and it turns this process into a game…

Screen Shot 2013-04-06 at 19.10.19

You have your own skill tree and you can compete with your friends as you complete new missions! 🙂

Screen Shot 2013-04-06 at 19.10.51

It also has its iPhone application. Wherever you go, you can continue gaining new skills and beat your friends out.

Do you want to try? You can visit the website here: http://duolingo.com/

Visit our Facebook page to read and enjoy more posts about languages!

You can also follow me on Twitter.

Let’s get connected more! We are on Google+.

What about learning more about AIM Consulting?

 

 

Rearrange Letters, Form New Words!

Sometimes, you can generate tens of new words using the same letters of a certain word. What you find is generally quite amazing!

Here below, you can see a funny example of rearranging the letters and forming new words out of them! I’m sure you can add many more to this list. If anything comes to your mind, please do not hesitate to leave a comment! 🙂

5433_436300809793166_1903715099_n

 

Visit our Facebook page to read and enjoy more posts about languages!

You can also follow me on Twitter.

Let’s get connected more! We are on Google+.

What about learning more about AIM Consulting?

New Update to Google Translate

We all know that Google Translate cannot produce decent translations but we cannot deny the fact that it is a useful tool for everyone. Since we are curious about every language, it helps a lot about understanding the general topic of a text. For example, I don’t know Italian, but when I paste an Italian text and translate it into English, I can perfectly understand what the text is about.

I’m sure we all have at least one funny story to tell about Google Translate, but we should also appreciate this technology. They have a new update and we can use it offline now!

Here is what the news about:

Google updated its Google Translate app for Android with offline support and vertical text translation. You can download the new version now directly from the Google Play Store.

The offline language packages include support for 50 languages. To use them, just select “Offline Languages” in the app menu to see all the offline language packages available for download. To enable offline translation between any two languages, you need to select them both in the offline languages menu.

base64334acdc92f0ed5b6 730x430 Google Translate for Android gets 50 language packages for offline translation on Gingerbread and up

The addition of offline support is a very big move from a company like Google which is obsessed with online services and moving everything to the Web. For that reason alone it’s great to see the company a move that goes against its very DNA. Google admits the “offline models are less comprehensive than their online equivalents” but still says they get the job done “when you are traveling abroad with poor reception or without mobile data access.”

Many users have Internet access when they need to translate something, but it’s hardly a guarantee. If you’re traveling with your phone or tablet and need to figure out what something means on the go, you can now refer to your Google Translate app and get an answer without worrying about finding a Wi-Fi hotspot.

Here’s the official Google Translate 2.6 for Android changelog:

  • Translate without a network connection with offline language packages (available on Android 2.3 and above).
  • Translate vertical text in Chinese, Japanese, and Korean with your Camera.

Click here to read more.

Visit our Facebook page to read and enjoy more posts about languages!

You can also follow me on Twitter.

Let’s get connected more! We are on Google+.

What about learning more about AIM Consulting?

 

%d bloggers like this: