Archive for April, 2014

Irreversible Spelling and Grammar Mistakes

Sometimes, I even forget the spelling of the easiest word and I just look at the word for seconds. 🙂 Then when I think the word in another context, somehow I recall the true spelling. 🙂 I’m sure this happens to all of us- even English it is your native language! Such mistakes/situations do not harm us generally because you can always look up a dictionary and edit the spelling.

However, there are some irreversible mistakes. Not irreversible completely but really hard to edit. 🙂 When you check the images here, you’ll see what I mean!!! 🙂

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For more tattoo spelling and grammar mistakes: http://dailyamazingfacts.net/funny/tattoo-spelling-mistakes?page=0

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New Meanings for Old Words

3 years ago, I’ve come across this article and it was quite funny and creative. Back then, I didn’t have so much followers but I can say that this blog post resulted in many new followers! 🙂

For those who hasn’t read it, which I think there is a lot people out there as such, I highly recommend you to check it out for all these funny definitions of everyday words! 🙂

Conference room np. A place where everyone talks, no one listens, and later everyone disagrees about what was said.

Doctor n. A person who kills your ills with pills then kills you with bills.

Lecture n. The art of transferring information from the notes of the lecturer to the notes of the lecturees without passing through the minds of either.

Tears n. The means by which masculine will-power is defeated by feminine water-power.

Carnation n. Country where each citizen owns an automobile

Emotion n. Electron movement (also e-motion).

Maritime n. Hour of a wedding.

Catacomb, n. What a feline uses to straighten its hair.

Biology, n. The scientific study of the number two.

Thesaurus, n. A dinosaur that studies words.

Hamlet, n. A small pig.

Tumor, n. One more than one more.

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Fictional Languages: Mangani

Well, I didn’t remember this one when I first heard but then I made some research and I realized that such a language exists in books! It is a sound from our childhood. 🙂

As Listverse says, Mangani is the language of the apes from Edgar Rice Burrough’s Tarzan novels, and also the word by which the apes refer to themselves. It is described as being composed of guttural sounds that represent nouns and basic concepts. However, the written lexicon, as provided by Burroughs, is much more complex and made of real words, similar in pronunciation to many African languages from the area in which the books take place.

I hope this little information takes you to your childhood, as well. 🙂

 

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You can read more here: http://listverse.com/2009/03/22/10-fascinating-fictional-languages/

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5 Techniques to Speak Any Language

This is the dream of every one of us, I know. 🙂 Speaking any language and rebuilding the Babel tower again…

If I want to learn a specific language, the first I’d do is to listen to songs that are written in that language. 🙂 Once you fall in love with songs and the culture, the rest is easy. For example, I wanted to learn Spanish because I went to a Bachata dance course and I fell in love with all the songs that were played in the course! I just wanted to understand and feel the songs when I dance… Anyway. This is just a short story but there are real (!) techniques if you want to learn more than one language.

Here it comes:

 

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Geeky Language Facts – Part#2

Last week, I’ve posted the first part of the geeky language facts and I received really good comments. First of all, I want to thank Buzzfeed for this funny compilation. I am a big fan of Buzzfeed and when they post lists about languages, I just love them more! 🙂

Here comes the second part!

 

26. ‘I’m a dot in a place’ is an anagram of ‘a decimal point’.

27. In Albanian there are 27 words for ‘moustache’ including ‘dirs ur’ – meaning the newly sprouted moustache of an adolescent.

28. In Hawaiian, the verb ‘pana po’o’ means to scratch your head in order to remember something you’ve forgotten.

29. In Sinhala (Sri Lanka) the word ‘ayubowan’ means ‘good morning’, ‘good afternoon’, ‘good evening’, ‘good night’ and ‘goodbye’.

30. In Masai, the name of a dead child, woman or warrior is not spoken again. If their name is also a word that is used every day, then it is no longer used by the bereaved family.

31. In Japan, four (shi) and nine (ku) are considered unlucky numbers, because the words sound the same as those for ‘death’ and ‘pain or worry’.

32. Because of this, some hospitals don’t have room numbers 4, 9, 14, 19 or 42. Forty-two (‘shi-ni’) means ‘to die’, 420 (‘shi-ni-rei’) means ‘a dead spirit’ and 24 (‘ni-shi’) is double death.

33. The Russian word for a railway station is ‘vokzal’. This is because when a Russian convoy visited Vauxhall in South London in 1840, they confused the name of the railway station there for the general name of the building. From then on, railway stations in Russia were called ‘vokzal’. Although this story has beencontested.

34. ‘Achaplinarse’ is a Spanish (Central American Spanish) word which means to hesitate and then run away in the style of Charlie Chaplin.

35. “Así te tragues un pavo y todas las plumas se conviertan en cuchillas de afeitar” is a Spanish curse, meaning ‘may all your turkey’s feathers turn into razor blades’.

 

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36. The Romanian proverb ‘dacă doi îți spun că ești beat, du-te și te culcă’ translates as ‘if two people say you’re drunk, go to sleep’. Which is just good advice.

37. When a word spelled backward (such as ‘pots’), creates another word (‘stop’) it’s called a semordnilap, which is ‘palindromes’ backward.

38. A pangram is a sentence which contains every letter of the alphabet only once. For example: ‘Cwm fjord-bank glyphs vext quiz’ which means ‘carved symbols in a mountain hollow on the bank of an inlet irritated an eccentric person’.

39. ‘Sgriob’ (Scottish Gaelic) denotes the itchiness that overcomes the upper lip just before taking a sip of whiskey.

40. ‘Lampadato’ (Italian) describes a person who gets tanned using a sun lamp.

41. ‘Katahara itai’ (Japanese) means laughing so much that one of your sides hurts.

42. ‘Backpfeifengesicht’ (German) means a face that cries out for a fist in it.

43. ‘Zastrich’ (Russian) means to cut one’s nails too short.

44. ‘Vogget’ (Cornish) means to hop on one leg.

45. ‘Guuguu’ (Japanese) describes the sound of someone in a deep sleep, snoring.

46. ‘Viajou na maionese’ is a Portuguese phrase meaning ‘to live in a dream world’ (literally to travel in the mayonnaise).

47. ‘U’ (Samoan) means an enlarged land snail.

48. ‘U’ (Xeta, Brazil) to eat animal meat.

49. ‘U’ (Burmese) means a male over 45 (literally an uncle).

50. In Somali there are 43 words relating to camels (for example, ‘cayuun’ meaning ‘camel spit’.)

51. ‘Ben’ (Turkish), ‘Ami’ (Bengali), ‘Fi’ (Welsh), ‘Jo’ (Catalan), ‘Mama’ (Sinhala), ‘Mimi’ (Swahili) and ‘Man’ (Wolof) all mean ‘I’.

 

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Source: http://www.buzzfeed.com/ailbhemalone/language-facts-that-will-blow-your-mind

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