Archive for February, 2014

Translation Gifs

I love gifs, especially the ones with a clever and witty captions. 🙂 You just take a 2-seconds of a video out of its context and write a new caption and give a new meaning to it. It is just genius. 🙂

And, I’m sure you’ll love these ones much more because they are all about translation! You just experience them like everyday and I’m quite sure you’ll feel very close to them. This is a tumblr account and I’ve already bookmarked it! You can also send your own memes and they just publish them…

Here, I chose some of them that I feel very close. 🙂 The captions are under the gifs. You can follow the blog here: https://tran.sl/memes/

 

When the client sends an updated text after I started translating it

 

When another translator points out an error on my work

 

When I see Machine Translated text

 

When the CAT tool crashes without saving my data first

 

Here, translate this for 5 euros a page

 

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Fictional Languages: Parseltongue

Harry, Voldemort, Snape… You know what I mean- they can all speak parseltongue. Aren’t we so convinced that parseltongue is a real language like other fictional languages. I just cannot believe this! 🙂 I even found a machine translator that can translate from English to parseltongue. It is amazing to see how people such an effort in fictional languages… Here is the website: http://www.theparselmouth.com/

For those who are not familiar with parseltongue, here is a video by Snape:

You can read more here: http://listverse.com/2009/03/22/10-fascinating-fictional-languages/

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Shakespeare Movie Adaptations

Last weekend, I bought all the potato chips and cookies, and I dedicated all my time to the movie adaptations of Jane Austin books. I simply love Jane Austin, just like most of my colleagues, and I find some movie adaptations quite successful. Then I came across that blog post about “Great Shakespeare Movie Adaptations”. Surprisingly, I’ve watched none of them! Next weekend’s plan is already set but I just wonder what you think about movie adaptations of great literature pieces.

P.S. The comments are not mine, you can click here to read more.

 

2000, LOVE'S LABOUR'S LOST

 

Love’s Labour’s Lost (2000)

Not a perfect adaptation by any means, but one with plenty of ambition

Much Ado About Nothing (2012)

It’s a brisk adaptation that is much funnier than most. Amy Acker is particularly good as Beatrice, pratfalling and wisecracking like a 1940s screwball heroine.

Much Ado About Nothing (1993)

An explosion of loviness, with Kenneth Branagh, Emma Thompson, Kate Beckinsale, Richard Briers, Imelda Staunton and other posh people making up the British side of this comedy of mistaken identities and suppressed affections

10 Things I Hate About You (1999)

After Romeo + Juliet, transposing Shakespeare to the halls of American high schools became, like, totally a thing.

Coriolanus (2012)

Ralph Fienne’s directorial debut is a brooding, bloodthirsty take on the tale of a war hero whose optimism and pride turn to cruelty and bitterness as his rivals and self-regard bring him low.

West Side Story (1961)

Romeo and Juliet again, but this time turned into a New York musical with two rival street gangs and Tony, a member of the American gang, falling for Maria, the sister of the leader of the Puerto Rican gang.

Hamlet (1996)

There are several arguments for the best screen Hamlet. There’s probably quite a big crowd screaming for the Laurence Olivier 1948 version, which won a Best Picture Oscar but is rather stagey and simplifies the play.

Henry V (1944)

You’ve got to have one Laurence Olivier in any Shakespeare list, so it’s this grand, experimental take on Henry V.

Throne Of Blood (1957)

Using the plot but not the text of Macbeth, Akira Kurosawa relocates the Scottish play to feudal Japan.

William Shakespeare’s Romeo + Juliet (1996)

You won’t find another Shakespeare adaptation that matches Baz Luhrmann’s for bravado and invention.

 

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Fictional Languages: Languages of Arda

There are tens of fictional languages that are most common than the rest of the “real” languages spoken by “real” communities. 🙂 Linguistically, they all have their logical structure and vocabulary and they attract thousands of people! 🙂 Yeah, I’m talking about the languages we see in famous movies and science fiction literature.

Today, I want to introduce “languages of Arda”! Here is short explanation by http://www.listverse.com

The above term is used to describe the many fictional languages invented by J.R.R. Tolkien for The Lord of the Rings and other works taking place in Middle-Earth. This was done out of a desire to give real linguistic depth to names and places that Tolkien felt were lacking in fantasy and science fiction. The two most mature of these languages are Quenya (High-Elvish – heard in the video clip above) and Sindarin.

The depth and complexity of these two languages are incredible, as demonstrated by their influence on Middle-Earth culture and other Middle-Earth languages. What is even more amazing is the sheer number of languages Tolkien created for his world, with each race having dozens of offshoots and dialects.

If you wonder how it sounds, here you are:


You can read more here: http://listverse.com/2009/03/22/10-fascinating-fictional-languages/

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5 Interesting Endangered Languages With Fewer Than 10,000 Speakers

towerbabel Sometimes, I feel like we strive to build the Babel Tower… Really, when I hear people speaking, every day they become more similar to each other with new technological words and “trendy” phrases. In Turkey, we have a new saying “plaza Turkish”. This is half English and half Turkish- kind of funny. Anyway, I guess it is one of our humanly instincts to speak the same language eventually. :p

While some major languages are degenerated, some other just disappear or begin to be spoken by only a few people. Here are 5 interesting endangered languages with fewer than 10.000 speakers.

Thank you Omniglot for this compilation. You can always read the whole article by clicking the link at the bottom.

Hawaiian (ʻŌlelo Hawaiʻi)

Until the year 2000, the Hawaiian language was spoken by as little as 2,000 native speakers and its demise was the result of colonialism and English replacing Hawaiian as the primary spoken and written language in the islands.

Ainu (アイヌ イタ / Aynu itak)

Today, there are less than 25,000 ethnic Ainu left, and of those less than 100 are native Ainu speakers in Japanese isles.

Jeru (Aka-Jeru)

Jeru is a language that is spoken in the Andaman Islands, located just south of Burma in the Indian Ocean. It is only spoken by about 20 individuals…

Carabayo

The Carabayo, also known as the Yuri, is a tribe in the Columbian Amazon that has had relatively little contact with the outside world and is considered a protected tribe by the Columbian government. There is only an estimated 150 native speakers left.

Klingon (tlhIngan Hol)

While you may argue that Klingon is a fictional language, Star Trek fans everywhere are willing to fight to the death to defend its honor. Fictional languages can become more popular than ones that evolved naturally. Today, there are about 30 fluent Klingon speakers.

Thanks for the article writer who has compiled such an interesting list. You can visit the blog here. 

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