The Maps of Common Words

10 mins ago, I came across to a very interesting content about 8 common words and their distribution in Europe. The source also gives short introductions about their etymology! 🙂

I love such content because I kind of have a visual memory and when I see a word in a video game or in an ad, I just don’t forget them no matter how many years pass. I’m sure, as language learners and lovers, you experience this as well. That’s why it is a teaching strategy, adopted by most of second-language teachers.

Thanks http://www.businessinsider.com/ for this great compilation! I guess they get this content from Reddit though. In short, thanks whoever came up this idea and visualized the distribution of these words for us. 🙂

You can go to the source and read more by clicking the link at the bottom.

“The word for “church” shows the influence of ancient Greece:”

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“Bear” appears to be influenced by Russia, where largest brown bear population in Europe can be found. Notice the dominant word literally means “honey-eater.”

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“Apple” has a lot of diversity: Notice how the word in Finland and Estonia may come from a Indo-Iranian origin.”

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“Orange” is an interesting one. In the west it comes form Sanskrit while the dominant word in much of eastern and northern Europe comes from a word meaning “apple from China.”

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“Garoful,” the ancient Greek word for “rose,” only remains in northeastern Italy.”

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“Most of Europe derives “pineapple” from the Guarani language, which is an indigenous language of South America, although the U.K. (and consequently the U.S.) get the word from Latin.”

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Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/european-maps-showing-origins-of-common-words-2013-11

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One response to this post.

  1. Posted by giuliano on March 9, 2014 at 21:05

    Very interesting, I found we can explore every word in: http://www.semiotycs.com

    Reply

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