Archive for July, 2013

Real-time Translation Service by Google

android_speech-580-75Maybe you’ve heard of it but 3 days ago, Google announced that a real-time translator is on its way- and it is for mobile!

Of course the concern of this tool is not “perfect translation” but to give at least the gist of any speech real-time, on the phone.

I don’t wanna make it longer and I’ll give you the details of the article which was published at techradar.com:

 

Google has its sights set on the future with projects likeGoogle Fiber and Google Glass, and now it’s adding real time voice-to-voice translation to that list as well.

Google’s Vice President of Android Hugo Barra said this week that Google is now in the early stages of creating real-time translation software that it hopes to perfect within the next “several years,” according to The UK Times.

The company already has prototype phones that can translate speech in real time, so that a user speaks into the device in one language and the person on the other end hears it in a different one, like the fictional Babel fish in “The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy” or the TARDIS in “Doctor Who.”

“That is where we’re headed,” Barra told the publication. “We’ve got tons of prototypes of that sort of interaction, and I’ve played with it every other week to see how much progress we’ve made.”

To read more, click here.

 

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German vs Other Languages

German is quite famous with its character and stance among other languages. 🙂 There are tens of content about this but this video I’ve just discovered is the best! I watched it like 5-6 times successively and I’ve laughed everytime I watched. 🙂

It reminded me of the first year in my university. I was supposed to choose German or French as a second language and I’ve listened many speeches in both languages before choosing. Then I decided on French. 🙂

I love German culture and German language but it’s harder than French in terms of word lengths and pronunciation. I’ve lived in the Flemish part of Belgium for 6 months but I could only learn the daily language a bit (which was enough only for my survival). This video justifies why I couldn’t learn it ever.

Anyway you’ll understand what I mean after watching the video. 🙂

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How Do Some Philosophers Affect the Others?

Normally, I post such photos to our Facebook page. However, I like this one a lot and want to share it with a wider audience. 🙂 I know it is not about translation but I’m sure you always like such content because someone really has thought about it and worked on it. I hope you’ll also like it, too 🙂

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Roger That!

roger-that-319Last night I was watching a movie called “Olympus Has Fallen”. I don’t know if you’ve heard of it but it is a good one, I recommend. 🙂

Anyway, during the movie, I heard “Roger That” a lot. Of course it was not my first time hearing it but it was the first time it made me think. I decided to search why the military use “Roger That” instead of “okey” or “understood” 🙂

I learned that it was first used during WWII. Here is what I’ve found on web:

 

 

“Roger” means “I have received all of the last transmission” in both military and civilian aviation radio communications. This usage comes from the initial R of received: R was calledRoger in the radio alphabets or spelling alphabets in use by the military at the time of the invention of the radio, such as the Joint Army/Navy Phonetic Alphabet and RAF phonetic alphabet. It is also often shortened in writing to “rgr”. The word Romeo is used for “R”, rather than “Roger” in the modern international NATO phonetic alphabet.

Contrary to popular belief, Roger does not mean or imply both “received” and “I will comply.” That distinction goes to the contraction wilco (from, “will comply”), which is used exclusively if the speaker intends to say “received and will comply.” Thus, the phrase “Roger Wilco” is both procedurally incorrect and redundant. (Wikipedia)

“I was told during my Navy training that ROGER stands for Received Order Given, Expect Results.” (Andy McBride)

 

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