Tips for Young Translator Candidates

 

During my studies in university, I have understood that translation is not just translating word or phrases, but also using your general knowledge on any subject and interpreting the context considering the target culture. It is more than just a combination of words. To save up your experiences or knowledge (here, I do not mean memorizing words or grammer), you should hit the road as soon as possible. If you want to be a good translator, there are a couple of points to know that you should bear in mind. Rose Newell brings those points up in her article. It is a very comprehensive one. I just try to give an intrdouction for each topic. You can read the rest by clicking the link. Enjoy!

It’s not just about the books…

A key point to remember when encouraging a youngster to learn a foreign language is that youngsters learn differently. Education today is very different compared to how when we were growing up (I know, I am a relative youngster myself, but schools today still look like the Bridge of the Enterprise compared to when I was at school). More…

Okay, a bit about books…

Of the boring basics, I would suggest your youngster has a good quality, easy to read and comprehensive dictionary, appropriate to their level (perhaps a little above, to encourage their curiosity). It may be that there is some basic grammar explained in the dictionary you purchase. However, a good quality, well-explained, clearly laid-out grammar book with exercises (or one with the rules, and another with the exercises) is a good idea. If your youngster is enthusiastic, you could try out some language textbooks geared towards younger learnersMore…

Exchange programmes

Your youngster’s school, college, local youth group or religious centre may be organising a trip to an area where this country is spoken. This can be a great opportunity to learn more about the language and culture and make lasting friendships. However, make sure the opportunity is not wasted as best as you can by ensuring your youngster (insofar as it is possible) bonds with their exchange partner – spending more time with them and others in the country.

Holidays abroad

If you and your family can afford it, this is a great option. Encouraging the youngster to order the bread stick in French, or Breze in German, is a chance for your youngster to feel responsible, helpful, gifted and unique – especially if their knowledge in this area begins to exceed that of their parents. More…

Foreign-language films

It’s relatively obvious that this will help people to be inspired by a culture and its language. Anime certainly seems to have done this for Japanese. More…

Foreign books

Some people just enjoy reading. Encourage this spirit by buying them some books in their foreign language. Be careful to keep it at a level they can manage, or, if you are lucky, you might be able to find some bilingual books. More…

Language games

There are lots of games you can play based on foreign languages. I used to add a competitive element to conversations with my language buddy with a little game. As an example, I would speak in German and she would answer in English, and I would have to keep speaking in German and her in English. More…

Computer games

A lot of people are surprised by this suggestion, however, not your average 14 year old German schoolboy. Okay, I don’t know that many, but the couple I have met seemed to confirm this. In fluent English. More…

Online chat

This is a slightly controversial one, especially if you otherwise have chat banned in your household. For older children who use this anyway, perhaps it is not such a bad thing to encourage, however, if it advances their language skills and friendships with native speakers of foreign languages. More…

Social media and email

As with the above, social media such as Facebook, Twitter, Myspace and Bebo are great for keeping in touch with friends abroad. Also remember that there are some socialnetworks, such as the German StudiVZ, which are more specific to one area and language (although now with the option to use it in English). More…

 

For the whole article, click here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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