Borrowing Words: Help or Hinder?

” Did you ever realize that we use elements from other languages when we think, or are even sure, that we use only one language? In this last sentence, there are at least five words that were borrowed from Latin: realize, use, elements, language and sure.” Jacomine Nortier has made me realize how the languages interdependent to each other. It is kind of inevitable using foreign words in our daily conversations and writings. However, we never feel that way because those words have already found a place for themselves in our languages. For example we barrow the scientific terms from the language which has advanced in science. In my translations, I am generally mixed up in using really native words or some barrowed softer and well known words. I know it is translators who shape the language substantially. I feel responsible whenever I use a foreign word instead of its native counterpart. However, sometimes, using barrowed words make more sense for the target language reader. I just can’t work this out.  Nortier highlights many important points about loan words and barrowing. Here you can find some parts from it. To read the whole article, click the link at the bottom:

(…)Did you ever realize that we use elements from other languages when we think, or are even sure, that we use only one language?

In this last sentence, there are at least five words that were borrowed from Latin: realizeuse, elementslanguage and sure. The words don’t only sound different in Latin, they look a little bit different as well. We use such words every day, and we don’t need to speak the other language to do so. We are often not even aware of using words from another language.

What is this borrowing about? Why do we do it? Is it restricted to English and Latin or is it more universal? That is what this article is about.

(…)

All languages borrow words from other languages and treat them as if they were their own. Or rather: the speakers are the actors, not the languages themselves, of course. Why do speakers borrow lexical material? Perhaps we (or they) find them cool and show that we are living in a globalizing world. Are languages not rich enough to take care of themselves without the help of words from outside?

Here are some reasons for borrowing:

(…) Sometimes new concepts are introduced including the words that are used for them. (…)

(…)  It helps us to make distinctions that were impossible otherwise. (…)

(…) We only borrow from languages that we look up to, languages with a higher status. (…)

(…) Most countries or communities don’t welcome foreign words with enthusiasm. (…)

(…)

For the rest of the article, click here.

Advertisements

One response to this post.

  1. Posted by :* on April 4, 2013 at 06:13

    cooooooooooooooooooooooooool! totes helped my projectt. should join deadbeat poetry. :*

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: